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Is surgery after 50 becoming the norm?

It’s true what they say; with age comes wisdom, maturity and a heightened desire to go under the knife and fix our appearance!

A study conducted by SunLife Big 50 revealed that 6 out of 10 people are enjoying life more than ever before since hitting the landmark age. However, being on the ‘wrong side of 50’ can sometimes spur aspirations to stay young and keep the number of wrinkles appearing at bay.

With growing attention surrounding social media and the pressures to look like those ‘perfect’ ‘un-edited’ celebs, it’s no surprise that the wiser generation are popping up more frequently in cosmetic clinics with an ambition to re-gain the lifted face they once had.

According to a study, a quarter of a million Brits admit to having opted for a nip, tuck, face lift or other procedure once hitting the big five-O. The surgeries they are undertaking have said to deduct four years physically but also ten years off their mental age.

The notions behind the surgeries, according to some of the clients, are that the procedures give them the body that matches their mind, looking as young as they feel which ultimately gives them confidence and the ability to no longer worry about what other people think of them.

Whilst those who undergo the cosmetic alterations say the surgeries have produced nothing but positivity in their lives; there is mounting concerns as to whether ‘growing older with grace’ still exists. It all boils down to should we be embracing aging rather than stopping it?

Managing client’s expectations. As a practitioner it is your job to make sure your customers do not come out of the surgery unhappy with the results; to do this they must be aware of what these results will be before they get on the table. Having a patient over the age of 50 believe that when they walk out of surgery they will look exactly like they did 30 years prior is incredibly unrealistic and automatically puts you at risk of a claim when the results are different to what they pictured.

You must make sure the customer has a realistic and reasonable idea of the outcome before the procedure is underway. Emphasis on the fact surgery will not turn the clock back 20 years but enhance already existing features is vital for handling their anticipations.

Ultimately you have to limit any potential risk of a claim. If you believe your client has impossible expectations you need to know when to say no. You can put yourself in danger if you carry out a surgery where you are aware the results will not match the client’s expectations.

If you need help on how to refuse surgery, take a look at our guide ‘How to say ‘No’ to Patients’.

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Celebrities drop the façade around cosmetic procedures

Celebrities are sabotaging one of lifestyle magazines’ traditional scoops by openly admitting to procedures they’ve undergone. The big names of Hollywood, music and reality TV are, it seems, less concerned than ever before about saving face by denying they’ve had work done.

Actors, musicians and others who inhabit the celebrity sphere are taking the guesswork out of “have they haven’t they” features, which are normally accompanied by a before and after photo, by explaining what they’ve had done, why, and in some cases, by whom.

Kylie Jenner has become the poster-girl for lip fillers by not only citing the specific treatment used for her lip fillers (Juvéderm), but the clinician (Dr Ourian in Beverly Hills). Meanwhile, her sister Khloe Kardashian is not only happy to divulge her use of non-invasive fat banishing treatment CoolSculpting, but even documented it on her familial reality TV show, Keeping Up with The Kardashians.

As treatments and procedures have changed, so has the rhetoric. In the past, celebrities could truthfully say they had not “gone under the knife” – thanks in large part to the approval of botulinum toxin for cosmetic use in 2002 which meant that radical surgery was no longer necessary to achieve a youthful appearance.

Paradoxically, now that cosmetic enhancements are generally far more subtle and less invasive, celebrities are de-stigmatising aesthetic enhancement and not holding back when asked what was, for many decades, a question they dreaded.

Just ask Jamie Lee Curtis.

“I’ve done it all,” she confessed. “I’ve had a little plastic surgery. I’ve had a little lipo. I’ve had a little Botox.”

Curtis’ reasons for her no-holds-barred disclosures are part of a bigger picture in which she describes addictions to painkillers and surgery.

For every cosmetic procedure, celebrity or otherwise, there’s a motivation behind it, whether it’s a desire to cover over the imprint of 10 years worth of grief, as with singer Linda Nolan, or simply a wish to enhance a specific feature or reduce the signs of ageing. Noticeably, celebrity openness about the procedures they have undergone is increasingly accompanied by an outpouring of the reasons why.

However, while the reasons may not have changed significantly over the years, the acknowledgement by celebrities that they have undergone cosmetic procedures is a more recent phenomenon.

Rapper Iggy Azalea is no stranger to more drastic enhancements, having undergone rhinoplasty and breast enhancements, and has no interest in pretending otherwise. “I’m not denying it,” she says. “Denying it is lame.”

Meanwhile, some practitioners have raised concerns over normalising cosmetic procedures. One such surgeon is Anthony Youn, who has noticed more and more young patients requesting enhancements.

He has warned that there are just as many psychological ramifications as physical risks around having work done, “With plastic surgery, the fact is you don’t always look better. Sometimes you just look different — and that can be traumatic for certain people.” While celebrity openness about undergoing cosmetic procedures may be a positive shift in some respects, it could also be contributing to these concerns about normalising such procedures, particularly for younger patients who are perhaps more likely to be influenced by celebrity culture.

Despite the fears expressed by Youn and unlike celebrities who’ve been cajoled into “confessing” because changes are so noticeable, others, such as Azalea, are wholly unapologetic about her decision to undergo surgery.

“There was nothing wrong with me. I think it’s a personal choice and anybody, man or woman, should be able to make an informed decision. If you want to change something, then that’s up to you.”

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Beauticians dropped from new cosmetic filler register

BotoxImage copyrightSCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Beauticians have been banned from joining a new register designed to make getting injected with fillers safer.

The voluntary register was opened by the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practitioners in April to everyone trained to a high standard.

But now it will include only those with medical training, after doctors and nurses threatened to boycott it.

The joint council said two beauticians had applied to be listed, alongside 20 clinicians with a further 105 pending.

However, the register will continue to list beauticians for other treatments, such as laser and chemical peels.

David Sines, who chairs the joint council, told BBC Radio 4’s You and Yours programme there was no way of checking whether beauticians had been adequately trained to inject fillers.

“We have found there are no training organisations or programmes in place in the UK to enable beauticians to qualify to the level we require.”

“We are arguing for statutory regulation.

“We cannot enforce these standards without that.”

‘I’m swapping nursing for botox’

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A Department of Health and Social Care official said: “The government takes the regulation of cosmetic procedures very seriously and we are currently exploring options to strengthen regulation.”

The register was backed by the actress Lesley Ash, who was ridiculed in the press for her “trout pout” after her lips were injected with industrial fillers.

She said: “I think it’s a fantastic thing that is happening now with the register. And I think a lot of it had to do with the publicity I got.

“Women having their lips filled were saying, ‘I don’t want to look like Lesley Ash.'”

Sue Ibrahim, from the British Association of Aesthetic Nurses, Doctors and Dentists, said the inclusion of beauticians for filler treatments had put the public at risk.

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